History and Natural Amenities

Our Water Source

  • Before we switched over to Lake Michigan water, Glen Ellyn was drinking from ground water. Our ground water in DuPage was sinking about ten feet a year on average. Unfortunately, instead of adjusting our usage habits to a more sustainable “take” from groundwater resources, we avoided the problem by switching to receiving water from Lake Michigan, which is also now facing sinking levels. At some point in our future, we must face our unsustainable water habits.

Water Rates Over Time

  • As the United States continues to use water faster than it is replenished by precipitation and groundwater recharge, water rates are expected to rise. Already, states that are experiencing the disruptive effects of climate change are setting their eyes on the Great Lakes region to meet their unsustainable water needs.

Water Bodies & Waterways in Town

  • Glen Ellyn is truly the Village of the five mineral springs. Glen Ellyn was put on the international map when people heard news that the five mineral springs here could heal the sick. From all over the globe, people flocked to soak their bodies in our waters and cake their skin with Lake Ellyn’s healing mud. As development continued, the springs dried up.
  • Glen Ellyn has many water bodies- most of which aren’t named yet: Lake Ellyn, Perry’s Pond, the East Branch of the DuPage River, Panfish Park Ponds, the pond at South Side Park, Lambert Lake, the ponds at Village Links, and the ponds at Russell Kirt Prairie.

Permeable Pavers

  • Permeable pavers allow rainwater to be absorbed back into the earth via the soil beneath the pavement as it filters through the cracks. These are being used more frequently in development projects throughout the Village.
  • Many residents have opted to use permeable pavers for their driveways. They have been used in the parking lot at the Library, as well as on Linden for the pull of parking at Lake Ellyn Park. The Village is looking to incorporate them in the future, including for the new downtown development plan (on Crescent and Main).

Village Improvements Projects

  • Lake Ellyn as a Water Catchment System. A comprehensive master plan has designated that native plantings will be installed around the banks of Lake Ellyn to reduce erosion and algae blooms. The plants hold soil with their roots in order to prevent erosion; they also sequester a great deal of runoff fertilizer from local lawns, preventing toxic algae blooms.
  • We Use Beet Juice! Salt is a persistent pollutant in the sediments of our rivers. Chloride levels build up and kill aquatic wildlife. DuPage County adds a chemical derived from beet juice to lower the melting point of ice in an effort to reduce salt use. Brine is also sprayed onto roads before a major snow event is expected to prevent accumulation.

 

What Can We Do?

Lifestyle Tips

  • Many states in the US are experiencing extreme drought; though we are lucky to have access to the fresh water of Lake Michigan, it is still important to be cognizant of our water use. There are many ways to reduce your daily water use, including: turning the faucet off when brushing your teeth, taking shorter showers, and only doing laundry with a full load.
  • If you are looking to update your home, you can also install water saving fixtures such as low flow faucets, showerheads, and toilets.
  • Click on the “Landscaping” section to your right to learn about rain barrels and lawn watering, too!

 

Future of the Village

Permeable Pavers

  • Permeable pavers allow rainwater to be absorbed back into the earth via the soil beneath the pavement as it filters through the cracks. These are being used more frequently in development projects throughout the Village.
  • Many residents have opted to use permeable pavers for their driveways. They have been used in the parking lot at the Library, as well as on Linden for the pull of parking at Lake Ellyn Park. The Village is looking to incorporate them in the future, including for the new downtown development plan (on Crescent and Main).

Village Improvements Projects

  • Lake Ellyn as a Water Catchment System. A comprehensive master plan has designated that native plantings will be installed around the banks of Lake Ellyn to reduce erosion and algae blooms. The plants hold soil with their roots in order to prevent erosion; they also sequester a great deal of runoff fertilizer from local lawns, preventing toxic algae blooms.
  • We Use Beet Juice! Salt is a persistent pollutant in the sediments of our rivers. Chloride levels build up and kill aquatic wildlife. DuPage County adds a chemical derived from beet juice to lower the melting point of ice in an effort to reduce salt use. Brine is also sprayed onto roads before a major snow event is expected to prevent accumulation.